Aimee Horton

When they turn three

Aug
17

The Beast is now officially three. That’s right.  My baby is one year older, he’s a big boy, growing up and all that crap.  Most importantly – he is now eligible for FREE nursery hours – thank goodness.  The first thing he said on his birthday morning – after looking rather startled to be woken up by a grinning mummy and daddy singing “Happy Birthdayy too youuu” – was “I have my birthday cake now”.  Which is good considering I managed to produce the perfect birthday cake.  One that I’d put my heart and soul into…and then because it was shit went scouring 3 supermarkets until I found the Toy Story one.

Present opening was some what of a scientific experiment, we discovered that a three year old boy will always go for the present wrapped in Buzz Lightyear paper (replace with appropriate fad of the moment) even if it’s small and not exciting looking rather then going for the massive box (containing hot wheels kit with lots of cars) that’s wrapped in boring red paper.  Note for Christmas: wrap current toys in bright paper = cheap win.  Yes?!

Unlike most toddler birthday parties, the build up to the event had been fairly relaxed, that’s the good thing about going for a picnic in the park and assigning food to Mr. Sainsburys or family – in fact – I’d been quite enjoying the bribery opportunity it gave me.  All week the battle between myself and the beast was “eat your dinner please” “no” “oh ok, I’ll have to cancel your party then”… It did however reach its peak (or all time low whichever way you chose look at it), and on Saturday morning I made four fake phone calls, all to “Jake-ums” mummy.  Two were from a supermarket car park while the beast lay on the floor sobbing because I wouldn’t give him any chocolate, I called her to cancel the party, and then because he came round to my way of thinking I had to “call” her back to say it was back on.   It may* have gone something along the lines of:

“Hello Jacobs Mummy – yes, I’m sorry Theo is being a very naughty boy and can’t have his party at all.  Yes, I know he’s meant to be a big boy but he clearly isn’t yet…just a baby, bye bye”

“NOOOO – NOT A BABY I’M A BIG BOY”

“Sorry darling, big boys don’t lie on the floor of car parks crying”

<cue screaming and passers by looking at me>

“Tell you what…if you’re a good boy, get up, climb into your car seat and let me blow your nose, I’ll call her back and see if Jacob can still come to the party, how does that sound”

R.E.S.U.L.T.

This was repeated at the traffic lights near Next when he tried to make a quick escape out of his car seat to pick up a biscuit he’d spotted on the floor.

*definitely  – it definitely  went like that.

We decided to get to the park early to set everything up and we draw attention to ourselves by lugging across a bag containing a gazebo, massive Toy Story balloon, and picnic tables.  Then just before 2pm the butterflies started, I’d nipped behind a tree and checked my make-up in a mini mirror (thank GOD I’d gone for the full work day application), I know what you’re thinking – this is a 3 year olds birthday party.  But it isn’t really is it? EVERYBODY KNOWS this is a social status situation.  This isn’t just about your friends and family any more.  This isn’t about your children having fun – they will anyway, there’s cake, crisps and enough space to run around and cause havoc.  This is about how the parents perceive you.  Nursery birthday parties are the first chance to form your relationships with other parents, work out who their friends are and ultimately what “class” you are.

At 2:03pm I’m regretting the breezy “from 2pm” timeslot on the card.  Luckily I see a figure in the distance pushing a stroller and carrying what looks like a present…and then another, and another – it’s begun.   I yank my jeggings up over my fat, suck my stomach in, wipe the snot off  Theo’s cheek, the sick off Larry’s top and begin to “circulate”.  As I work the picnic blanket like a pro I’m anxiously checking that the current friends are happy (secretly wishing I am part of the “beautiful” family as my mum referred to them when chatting the next day – I need to talk to K about getting fat please), whilst making small talk with all of The Beasts friends parents – they all seem lovely.  I have to nip off to for a wee in the trees (the child not me!) and pay some attention to my other son (Fatso is breaking peoples backs and loving the attention, before going for a walk in the pram to try and sleep).

After two hours the sky clouds over and we’re close to rain – I make them all sing happy birthday under the gazebo (we aren’t chavs ok.) and hand out the party bags whilst assigning one of my sisters the task of swiftly insert cake.  The loot is collected and stashed in the boot and we head home.

Unwrapping the presents before bedtime was probably not the best idea, but there’s no way out of it.  I’m SHATTERED.  We manage to get them all unwrapped – I make a list of what belongs to who, before starting the bedtime routine.  The fat one has a brief melt down between getting out of the bath and having his bottle, and an over tired, over sugared up beast stays hyper until about 8.30pm.  I’m EXHAUSTED.  We tidy up downstairs and think “thank god they’ll sleep well at night”.  Except they didn’t the beast woke up between 3am – 5am and wanted to play with all his toys. Fail.  He’s started his fourth year as he started his first – causing me to have very little sleep.

4 Responses to When they turn three

  1. Pingback: When you realise you’ll never have the final word again « The Perfect Bad Mummy

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