Aimee Horton

When you love the little things.

Jul
04

Hellooooo Friday! I’m ready for it, and I think everyone else is too! With a weekend of toddler tantrums, five-year-old meltdowns, and house explosions, I am more than ready to appreciate some of the little things. (more…)

When they smile.

May
04

I mentioned in my last post that I’ve not had the best week. A lot of it has been down to this cheeky chap.

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When you have to do the nursery dance…

Sep
05

So.  Nursery.  A controversal subject at the best of times (my grandma in-law informed me I was selfish for sending my children to nursery and going to work).  To me, nursery is great – not just because I’m an awful mother and don’t actually enjoy the whole craft/messy play malarky, but also, I have really seen my children benefit from nursery.  Their social skills, independence, language and development I feel has really come on.  I say “their” Fatso doesn’t really count.

I’m not saying it’s for everybody, for example, my sister is the most amazing mummy, she thrived on having her boys at home (something I’m actually super envious of, I was I was a better mum and missed my children when they are at nursery), and they are both super clever these days.  HOWEVER, for me and the boys – I think it’s the best thing they do.  And given the fact I’ve just made what could potentially be a life changing decision (this will no doubt be blogged about in the future, when the kinks are worked out), means I had to revist the thought of nursery.  I decided I’d rather not drink alcohol then not send my children to nursery.  I’m not going to pretend part of this decision isn’t selfish.  The boys. And Me.  At home – 5 days a week. Sounds like a frickin’ nightmare, however for them, I think it’s an essential part of their lives, so I will work my hardest to keep them there.

Whilst I’m raving about nursery, it also frustrates me that we have to continuously carry out the nursery “dance”.  Not so much right now, but previously.  All nurserys have their faults, ours on a whole is great, in fact, I really rate them (well one of the owners I love, the other one looks like she’s been hit with a spade and has an attitude to say she might have deserved it – but I don’t have much to do with her, and neither do the boys)…HOWEVER there are issues I’ve had to work through.  I’ve complained quite a lot – I think I’m known as a bit of a cow.

The nursery dance consists of a back and forth game where you are competing with nursery to try and keep your child in nursery for a WHOLE DAY without a phone call, a few examples of this dance consist of:

1. The Runny Eyes – Larry went through a stage of having a really bad cold, and it was in his eyes too.  The doctor confirmed that it was NOT conjunctivitis, and that it was infact snot, sometimes rubbed into his eyes, the others just runny eyes.  For a bout two weeks we had to follow the same process of picking him up – if we made it to the end of the day they’d inform us they’d had to wipe his eyes THREE TIMES that day.  The next morning we wipe the sleep out of his eyes and double check in the car as we drop him off, and then inevitably when you have to go and pick him up his eyes are clear (we JUST WIPED them Mrs Horton, HONEST), we get him home, no runny eyes, and the next day it happens again.

2. The REALLY Poorly Child – Then there’s the temperature.  I get a call saying one of the boys has a temperature and really isn’t himself, in fact he’s been quiet and poorly all day, and not touched his lunch.  To begin with I’d go and collect him straight away feeling it was my duty as a mummy.  Now that’s not the case. We used to get home and after a dose of Calpol (I BLOODY LOVE THAT STUFF) he’d be running around the house stuffing his face and pretending to be Buzz Frickin’ Lightyear.  These days I inform them to drug him up and call me in half an hour if he’s no better.  I’ve rarely had that second phone call.

3. The Sicky Fib – Now this is a eep situation.  I don’t want to send a poorly child to nursery, as it’s the other children that suffer from it.  However, you’ve got to work out what’s actual ill and what’s not.  Nursery have a rule that the children aren’t allowed back for 3 days if they’ve been sick.  So when Larry threw up one Saturday night, on the Monday I had to make an executive decision – he only threw up once, and throughout Sunday he was happy (as Larry) and bouncing his fatness about all over the place stuffing his face and playing.  I predicted that he may have just chocked on a bit of dribble (or pie he’d stored away in his cot for a later date).  So I didn’t tell nursery.  Is this wrong?

Now I’m free and easy it’s not as much of an issue, I’ll go and collect them, but picking up/keeping at home, none ill children is difficult for working mums and dads.  Nursery also sometimes tends to forget, that the majority of parents send their kids their because they go out to work.  Two phone calls stick in my mind.

1. I worked over an hour away from nursery – they knew this – and I got a call at 4pm in the snow one year saying “we’re closing in half an hour as it’s snowy, can you come and get the boy”.  er. Not really no.

2. I was in a meeting, in Leeds, and Matt was in Scotland.  The meeting was quite important.  When they called to say “come and get Larry he has a sticky eye” I had to inform them that my meeting didn’t finish for another hour then I was a couple of hours away.  They actually said “oh just leave the meeting he has a sticky eye”.  Er. Not that simple.  I know it SOUNDS simple, but in life sometimes it’s not that easy.

Reading back – I realise I give the impression that I don’t want to spend time with my children.  I have a feeling this will be another post.  And with that – I’m off to get the children.  They’ve made an entire day.  I’m shocked.